Review – The Adventures of Tintin

I managed to get free tickets to a preview screening of the film – read my slightly average review below:

Produced by Peter Jackson and directed by none other than Steven Spielberg himself, everyone knew that a Tintin movie (the rights of which the director has held since 1983) was going to be a big deal. The series of comics by revered Belgian writer Hergé, the first written in 1929, have been a global success, showered with praise and translated into more than 80 languages worldwide, while the most dedicated fans often brand themselves “Tintinologists”. It will therefore come as a huge relief for many that Spielberg’s motion-captured homage to the plucky red-haired hero is funny, cinematically impressive and intensely difficult not to like.

Jackson had previously convinced Spielberg that filming Tintin in live action would not do the comics justice. When watching the film, one has to agree. The motion-capture technology brings Tintin to life. It’s admirable how seriously Hergé’s animated world is taken, from the detail of the characters to the cartoonish action sequences. One stunning scene takes place in a Moroccan town where Tintin chases down three small pieces of paper vital to his investigation – he loses Haddock in a sidecar (who had just blown a water dam to bits with a bazooka) and ends up zip-lining down a telephone wire on the remaining wheel of a motorbike. That’s a tiny fraction of what happens, but the impressive thing is that a large amount of this scene takes place in a single shot. It’s animated with visual flair, colour and virtuosity and is a return for Spielberg to the films he made in the 1970s and 1980s. It’s by far his most entertaining film since Jurassic Park.

The characters are done very well. Haddock, played by Andy Serkis is alcoholic and delusional; Tintin (Jamie Bell), every strand of his trademark quiff blowing in the wind, is as adventurous as the books make him out to be; and Thompson and Thomson (Simon Pegg and Nick Frost), hilariously incompetent, provide great comic relief. There have been obvious problems in terms of “dead eyes” in motion capture (exemplified by the rather creepy Polar Express and Beowulf) but Tintin doesn’t suffer from this. In fact, when adapting

Tintin and Snowy

from a series of pictures in which character eyes are black dots, the filmmakers do surprisingly well in making Tintin, Haddock and others look more human. Character movements are smooth and appear natural; occasionally I thought I was watching live action.

The Adventures of Tintin is pure fun. In fact, it’s a visual treat that despite minor flaws (a drawn-out ending, flat 3D) is one of the best films I’ve seen this year, encompassing a glorious world, constantly funny jokes and impressive action set-pieces. Go and watch it. You won’t regret it.

4 stars out of 5

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